The Client-centred Blog

The information delusion

I moved offices recently and it was a wonderful opportunity to have a proper clear-out and throw out what I no longer needed.

On one shelf there was a large pile of notes and papers and as I began to go through them I realised they were all from the various conferences, events and seminars I had attended, going back over 20 years.

Some of the material was useful but it struck me what an information junkie I used to be!

One of the things I also realised was that despite all this information gathering I had only ever implemented a tiny fraction of it.

Have you had this experience too? You attend events, hear all these great ideas and then do not follow up?

I used to think this was a failing in me. I was not trying hard enough and I needed to set bigger, better goals, apply more will power and be more disciplined.

Over the years I have had people approach me for coaching who are having a similar experience themselves. They usually have a sense or feeling of being ‘stuck’ or having ‘plateaued out’.

When we feel like this it is so easy to conclude that what we need is more information.

But this is rarely the case. In fact, my need for so much information, as a strategy for making progress, was never going to pay off.

The ego is very sneaky.

It tricks us into holding back because what it is really trying to do is have us play safe and live within our comfort zone.

The deeper truth is that there is a hidden fear dressed up as a need for more information.

How do you deal with this? You must confront the feeling.

If you allow a fear to control you it holds it in place because you are buying into the illusion that the fear is real.

In coaching an adviser client of mine she wanted to coach some of her clients because she could see how this would benefit them. But, at the same time, she held back from sharing what she could see was going on with them.

She thought she needed more information on how to coach people.

Not so.

Together, we confronted the feeling. What was her real fear?

We eventually got back to her ultimate fear of running out of money and losing everything. If she told the truth to her clients (as she saw it), they might not like it and end the relationship.

Do you see what happens when fear runs amok? We make up all kind of c**p!

When you confront a feeling, head on, you are asking where it is coming from and it can NEVER come from the circumstance.

The only possible answer is from our thought in the moment. We feel our thinking, not our circumstances.

She realised how her thinking had got the better of her. And she also realised that it was holding back that would ultimately do more harm to her business. With her client’s best interests at heart and their permission she realised there would be no problems and she would be of greater service.

So, if you ever feel stuck and are tempted to go looking for more information, it is useful to pause, reflect and ask yourself if this is true?

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Leave a Comment

Related articles

The twelve client-centred mind shifts - part 1
You have worked hard to become a qualified financial professional. You are making a difference in the lives of your clients and your business is steady. This is a big, well-deserved success and there is much to celebrate. Yet at this stage you might also pause, reflect, and ask yourself, “What’s next?”
How to transcend the financial planner comfort zone
Our comfort zone can be very limiting. For instance, it can hold you back from realising your greater potential, making a bigger difference to your clients, and experiencing greater success. So, in this article I explore what a financial planner comfort zone is and what it takes to transcend it. 
How to deal with imposter syndrome
Do you ever feel like an imposter in your role, that you will get 'found out', or do not deserve your success? If so, you are far from alone as this is extremely common amongst business people.
Resilience: An essential key to building a financial planning practice
Have you noticed how resilience has become a hot topic in business? For instance, there are TED talks on it, articles in the Harvard Business Review, and covid brought into sharp focus how unforeseen events can literally change our lives in a moment. This article explores a deeper understanding of resilience and why it is key for building a financial planning practice.
Better time management for financial advisers and planners
As a financial planner are you as productive as you would like to be? Would you like to get more done, in less time, and with none of the stress? In this article I am going to explore the hidden factor that leads to genuinely better time management for financial advisers and planners.
Building a financial planning business - overcoming the biggest obstacle
Building a financial planning business is not easy! In fact, you are far from alone if you find it challenging. This article explores one of the biggest obstacles of all and how to rapidly get back on track.
Time management for financial planners - why helpful tips are not the answer
How often have you felt like you had way too much to do, way too little time to do it, and you've stressed out as a result?
To succeed you must have self belief... really?
If you have a goal or outcome that is important to you and you want to go for it, then what does self belief and whether you have it or not have to do with it?