The Client-centred Blog

The hidden secret to high-impact financial planning meetings

What defines the quality of a meeting?

Do you want to have your financial planning meetings be high-impact, high-engagement experiences for both your clients and you?

Of course! We all want this, don’t we?

There are also significant commercial reasons to ensure that client meetings are of the highest quality.

For instance:

*By getting to know your clients better and forging stronger relationships it leads to more business

*Clients who have a great experience of you tend to give you more referrals

*Happy, highly satisfied clients stick around for longer

But let’s also acknowledge that finances can be a heavy subject. Many advisers can inadvertently make their client meetings really hard work for their clients. For example, meetings are too heavy with detail, or there is too much talk about products, markets, and technical matters.

What defines the quality of a financial planning meeting?

If you reflect upon this question, what would you say?

The location? The content? The outcome? Fulfilling the agenda? The feelings people experience? The rapport? Winning the business? Some or all of these?

If you had asked me this question much earlier in my career, I would probably have said the outcome of a meeting was the biggest factor in its quality.

Yet I now see things differently.

Of course, we want the purpose of a meeting to be fulfilled, but when we think about the quality of a meeting what do we tend to reference?

We think of the tone or the feeling in the meeting.

A successful meeting is not just about what gets done but the spirit in which the meeting is held. The state of mind people are in massively influences the flow and content of a conversation.  

Financial planning meeting levels

The graphic below shows meeting levels and the direct correlation between state of mind and meeting quality.         

What are meeting levels

Effective financial planning meeting management

So, if you look at financial planners and advisers that run high-impact, high-engagement meetings, what are they doing?

I know it can so easily seem like the process, techniques, or behaviours are the key.

But there is something else far more important that creates the results you are looking for.

Imagine that processes, techniques, and behaviours are like apps. For an app to run there needs to be an operating system. You don’t see this, but it is essential and operates behind the scenes.

Well, it’s exactly the same for our human interactions.

An understanding the operating system behind the human mind is a game-changer, and here is why…

Operating systems are transformative. Once you have them, in a deeply embodied way, then processes, techniques, and behaviours are a natural by-product and intuitively come to you all the time.

Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day

Everyone knows the proverb, ‘Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.’

The reason I stopped focusing on processes, techniques, and behaviours is because I realised this is like giving someone a fish. Operating systems, on the other hand, are like teaching a man to fish.

In Robert C. Kausen’s book, ‘We’ve got to start meeting’ like this he says:

“The deeper you understand the role of Thought as the architect of human experience, the easier it is to guide the interactions of people in meetings to higher levels of effectiveness. Keep your eye on thought and state of mind, not behaviour.”

In other words, if you want to consistently create high-impact, high engagement financial planning meetings, your state of being is far more significant than what you are doing.

P.S. If you haven’t already, you can download my free report, ‘Magical Client Meetings Every time’ by clicking here.

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

Leave a Comment

Related articles

The right way to set financial planning goals
In this article, you are going to discover how to help your clients set financial planning goals, the right way. You are also going to learn the difference between healthy and unhealthy goals and how this makes a massive difference to your client’s level of motivation, inspiration, and enjoyment of life now.
Highly effective rapport building for financial planners
A deep rapport with your client is the foundation for a productive, profitable, and long-lasting relationship. Therefore, being highly effective at quickly building and maintaining a deep rapport is an essential skill for financial planners.
A simple guide to influencing financial planning clients
Do you want to become more effective at influencing financial planning clients? In this simple guide I explore one of the most crucial factors of influence you can apply immediately for better results.
One of the best financial planning questions and how to use it
Often, the best financial planning questions are the ones that help a client to open up and think more deeply. Why is this important? Because the impact of your financial planning and advice is directly correlated to quality of the information you gather from your client.
Should you take notes in a financial planning meeting?
What is the right approach to note taking in financial planning meetings? This is a question that often comes up in my coaching programmes with financial planners. So, let's take a closer look.
4 ways to create massive value financial planning meetings
How to do a brilliant financial planning fact find
Doing a brilliant financial planning fact find underpins everything that you do for a client. It is what differentiates you from other financial planners and is a golden opportunity to build exceptional relationships and provide massive value. But there are also two very different elements to fact finding.
5 steps financial planners can take to becoming a better listener
As a financial planner what value is there in becoming a better listener? Is it worth your time, effort, and focus to improve? This article explores the value of deep listening and 5 practical steps you can take to immediately become a better listener.
Asking essential financial planning questions: the ones that no one else thinks to ask
This article looks at an important aspect of asking financial planning questions that often get neglected. Often, financial advice is triggered when something happens or is going to happens in a client’s life. For instance, the sale of a business, divorce, or an upcoming retirement.
How financial planners can build instant trust with clients
As a financial planner building instant trust with clients is one of the biggest obstacles you will need to overcome. This article looks at a different yet highly effective approach.
What is the most important financial planning question of all?
Do you want to have greater impact with your clients, create more value, and escape the diminishing world of transactional financial advice? If so, there is an important financial planning question.
Presenting your clients financial plan - the key to success
How to get more financial planning referrals
Would you like to generate more high quality financial planning referrals?
Great people skills - in an instant!
Is it possible to have great people skills in an instant?
How to ask great financial planning questions
Asking great financial planning questions is the bedrock of gathering the information you need to create a highly compelling plan for your client.
Why is your financial planning practice culture the key to delivering exceptional service?
Are you committed to delivering exceptional client service? If so, employees who genuinely care, communicate well, and take responsibility are the key. The foundation of this resides in the business culture you create.
Are your financial planning conversations too nice?
What is the difference between a financial advisory conversation and a financial planning conversation?
Should Financial Planners stop talking about retirement?
Why should financial planners choose their language carefully in their financial planning conversations with clients?
Understanding your client’s world – key number 1
Financial Advice is so often delivered in very unimaginative ways that has little difference to how the majority of practitioners deliver it.